I found a lump in my breast #breastcancerawareness

I found a lump in my breast during a self examination about a month ago. There is nothing scarier than finding what you hope and pray won’t ever be there. I rediscovered the tender lump

I found a lump in my breast
I found a lump in my breast during a self examination about a month ago. There is nothing scarier than finding what you hope and pray won’t ever be there.

I rediscovered the tender lump again on Monday after I thought it had gone away. I was in denial and didn’t want to face the possibility that there could be something nefarious going on in there.

I eventually, after a lot of soul searching, told The Hubby on Wednesday. He, quite within his rights, was upset that I hadn’t told him when I found it the first time. So off I went to make the appointment I was dreading. I was lucky enough to get a mammogram appointment at The Bone and Breast Care Centre first thing this morning.

I found a lump in my breast

This isn’t the first time I have found a lump. I had a biopsy in 2008 that, thankfully, ended in a Fibroid diagnosis. I have been very conscientious about my breast health ever since.

I had to have my first mammogram in 2013 when we, my OBGYN and I, discovered another lump. That one came back clear, with the explanation being that I have a lot of dense fatty tissue in my breast, which was the “lump” that was found.

I found a lump in my breast
The Mammography Machine

Today’s mammogram and sonar went very well. I got the all clear!

The lump and tenderness I found is hormone related. Dr Ritz explained that, because the pain isn’t continuous and only occurs occasionally (ie during what would be “that time” of the month), there is no need for concern.

She has, however, told me that because there’s a history of “anomalies”, and possibly a family history, that I now need to get a mammogram every year.

I also asked when my daughters will have to start going in for examinations. It was explained to me when the breasts develop, that lumps and bumps are to be expected. We only need to start looking into examinations once the breasts have become “boobs” and have stopped developing. They will then have sonars (not mammograms) if necessary and as I understood it, only later in the teen years. This put my mind at ease as The Hubby’s paternal family has a history of breast cancer.

My Mammogram Experience

There are so many horror stories about mammograms doing the rounds. When I was told to go for my first one, I was concerned. I had heard they are painful and that the machine hurts you during the procedure. That has never been my experience. Yes, it is uncomfortable. Yes, it is a little awkward standing there with your boob being compressed in front of a strange woman. No, it is not humiliating standing there with your boob exposed. The staff at The Bone and Breast Care Centre have always been very caring and have never made me feel anything but well cared for while having the procedures.

What is Mammography?

A mammogram is a low dosage x-ray of each breast that is carefully evaluated by a radiologist. Mammography can reveal both harmless and cancerous growths when they are too small to be felt by you or your physician.

The American Cancer Society endorses mammography, along with yearly physical examinations and monthly self-examinations, as the most effective means of detecting breast cancer at its earliest and most treatable stage. Generally, mammography can reveal benign and cancerous growths before you or your physician can feel them. If detected at the earliest stage, breast cancer has a five-year survival rate of over 95 percent, as small breast cancers are more treatable and can be removed before they spread to other parts of the body.

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I urge you, if you have any concerns about your breasts, to go visit your gynecologist. Discuss the procedure options or at the very least, ask for a sonar.